These are coming in slowly, so I'll update the post as I find more. 

You can read my review of Wind here.

 

USA Today:

On anybody else's typewriter, this might have turned into a mess. King, however, shows himself to be an ace storyteller yet again, spinning yarns like a favorite relative about a hero and his adventures in a world like our own but just slightly skewed.

Washington Post:

These interlocking narratives address a number of King’s recurring themes: families in crisis, imperiled children, the burdens of guilt and grief and the possibility of forgiveness. The structure of the book — a tale within a tale within a larger, ongoing tale — underscores another of its central points: the consolation to be found in stories. In Roland’s words, “A person’s never too old for stories . . . Man and boy, girl and woman, never too old. We live for them.” King’s entire career, one that has resulted in an ocean of narrative, is a fitting monument to this belief. At his characteristic best, King creates the kind of fully imagined fictional landscapes that a reader can inhabit for days at a stretch. In “The Wind Through the Keyhole,” he has done this once again.

 The Guardian:

King has proved that he does long well. 11.22.63 was a sprawling but unputdownable marathon to save JFK from assassination; Under the Dome a claustrophobic, vintage piece of horror. But when the author reins himself in and keeps it short, he's even better. King writes in his foreword that newcomers will be able to enjoy The Wind Through the Keyhole without reading the other Dark Tower books, but this feels like something of a leap. Better to start at the beginning, or to hold out hope for the book of collected Mid-World fairy stories that Roland mentions,Magic Tales of the Eld.

Tor.com:

All in all, this is certainly a worthwhile addition to the Dark Tower cycle. I own a full hardcover set of the books, and I intend to slip this one in between books 4 and 5. Reading scenes with Roland’s ka-tet; Eddie, Jake, Susannah, and Oy, brought back bittersweet memories of the gang. Going into this book I expected that to be worth the price of admission, but in the end, it was the story of Young Tim that pulled me in.

AZ Central:

On anybody else's typewriter, this might have turned into a mess. King, however, shows himself to be an ace storyteller yet again, spinning yarns like a favorite relative about a hero and his adventures in a world like our own but just slightly skewed.

Express.co.uk

 The book adds little to the overall Dark Tower sequence, King simply telling a few more stories set in his favourite fictional universe, and while some of the other Dark Tower novels can occasionally feel like too rich a stew, this one is perfectly balanced; another excellent example of King’s sheer skill as a storyteller. It is warmly recommended to all readers, even those allergic to dragons.

The Independent:

Baffling as the stories occasionally are, King's ability to entertain and unsettle cannot be denied. The skill with which he delivers a shock (Bern Kell's return) or scenes of gothic terror (Skin-Man eats lunch) is simply unmatched by other contemporary novelists. And somehow, the telling does you good. As King himself notes: "Horror's a worm that needs to be coughed out before it breeds." I couldn't agree more, but best thee have a bucket handy.

 

More to Come.

 

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AuthorJoe Camillieri
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